Gallery

Average U.S. Sugar Consumption Per Person

sugar-handsThe average American consumes over three times as much sugar as recommended. U.S. sugar consumption is 77.1 pounds of sugar per person per year, as estimated by the USDA:

2014 — Refined Sugar from Beet or Sugarcane
40.2 lbs/year per person (adjusted for loss)
USDA Sugar Yearbook Table 51

2014 — High Fructose Corn Syrup
26.8 pounds of HFCS per person per year (adjusted for pre-consumer losses)
USDA Sugar Yearbook Table 52

2014 — Other Caloric Sweeteners
10.1 lbs/year per person (adjusted for loss)
USDA Sugar Yearbook Table 53

77.1 lbs of sugars per person per year, which is just under 1.48 lbs per week
or 370 kcal/day (95.6 grams/day of sugar)

Recommended sugar intake is 5% of total daily calories

daily calories — 5% in kcal — 5% in grams of sugar
1700 kcal — 85 kcal — 22 grams
1800 kcal — 90 kcal — 23 grams
1900 kcal — 95 kcal — 24.5 grams
2000 kcal — 100 kcal — 26 grams
2100 kcal — 105 kcal — 27 grams
2200 kcal — 110 kcal — 28.5 grams
2300 kcal — 115 kcal — 30 grams
2400 kcal — 120 kcal — 31 grams

Excess sugar consumption is associated with increased risk of:

Cardio-Vascular Disease mortality (CVD) [1]
Breast Cancer [2]
Lung Cancer [3]
Colorectal Cancer [4]
Pancreatic Cancer [5]
Type 2 Diabetes [6]
Obesity [7]
High Blood Pressure [8]
Metabolic Syndrome [9]
Cognitive Decline [10]
Cataracts [11]

Endnotes
[1] Yang et al., Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults; JAMA Internal Medicine. 2014;174(4):516-524.
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=1819573
[2] Bradshaw et al., Consumption of sweet foods and breast cancer risk: a case-control study of women on Long Island, New York; Cancer Causes & Control. October 2009, Volume 20, Issue 8, pp 1509-1515.
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10552-009-9343-x
[3] Stefani et al., Dietary sugar and lung cancer: A case-control study in Uruguay; Nutrition and Cancer. Volume 31, Issue 2, 1998. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01635589809514692
[4] Franceschi et al., Food Groups and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Italy; International Journal of Cancer. 72, 56-61 (1997) http://livebetterlife.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Colon-Cancer-And-Potato-Italy.pdf
[5] Larsson et al., Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study; American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. November 2006, vol. 84, no. 5, p. 1171-1176.
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/84/5/1171.full
[6] Hu et al., Diet, Lifestyle, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women; New England Journal of Medicine. 2001; 345:790-797.
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa010492#t=article
[7] Malik and Hu, Sweeteners and risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes: the role of sugar-sweetened beverages; Current Diabetes Reports. January 2012;
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11892-012-0259-6#/page-1
[8] Chen et al., Reducing Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Is Associated With Reduced Blood Pressure; Circulation, Epidemiology and Prevention; American Heart Association;
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/121/22/2398.short
[9] Malik et al., Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes; Diabetes Care, American Diabetes Association, 33:2477–2483, 2010;
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/11/2477.short
[10] Molteni et al., A high-fat, refined sugar diet reduces hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuronal plasticity, and learning; Neuroscience. Volume 112, Issue 4, 19 July 2002, Pages 803-814.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306452202001239
[11] Veromann et al., Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development; Ophthalmologica 2003;217:302-307. http://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/70640

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